The Real Meaning of Labor Day.

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

Support American Labor with All American Clothing Co. this Labor Day: Free Shipping on orders of $50 or more.

Founder of Labor Day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Trace an All American Made Jean back to over 12,000 American workers, including the American farmers who grew the cotton.

A Nationwide Holiday

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

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Made in USA: Behind the label

Josh Miller

Josh Miller of ‘Made in the USA: the 30 Day Journey’

From Top Line

After a manufacturing plant closed down in his hometown of Ravenswood, W.Va., resulting in 650 people losing their jobs, Josh Miller began to wonder what was really made in America anymore.

He decided to set out on a 30-day road trip across the United States in search of answers for how to revive American manufacturing – all the while trying to survive on only goods and products stamped with “Made in USA.”

“I really thought that I could take this opportunity to give the Made in America movement and these folks a voice,” said Miller, who documented his trip in a film, “Made in the USA: The 30 Day Journey.”

Miller told Top Line that the Made in America movement isn’t so much about trying to get people to buy only American-made products that might be more expensive than foreign-made ones, but it’s about finding solutions to lower the prices of American-made products.

“I think there are a lot of policies that we can push to help allow our businesses here in America to help reduce costs and lower the prices,” Miller said. “We need to put policies in place that allow us to out compete the world, and that’s what this film was about.”

Watch the video and read more  here> http://goo.gl/0xHy3

5 Ways YOU Can Get Involved with the All American Clothing Co.

The All American Clothing Co. loves to hear from our made in America supporters. It is a goal of ours to maintain a good connection and relationship with you. The more we can connect together, the more we can support and create American jobs.  Here are 5 ways we can do just that…

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1. Subscribe to the All American Newsletter

The All American Clothing Co. sends out exclusive discounts, giveaways, and news events in the All American Newsletter (located right hand side on home page). Perhaps you will love the many exclusive offers we put together for our made in America supporters. Subscribe for all things All American today!

2. Follow All American Clothing Co. on Facebook

Follow us on Facebook, but don’t stop there! We love to connect with our fans. Please send us a photo, tell us about the last item you ordered, or just comment on something we posted. Chances are, we will respond to whatever you say!

3. Give a Product Review

This is one of the most important ways you can get involved with the All American Clothing Co. We are one of the few companies who allow our fans to rate the product and help us make adjustments to the design and pattern of our USA made clothing items. This allows you to make suggestions for the next production line of USA made clothing. The best part is that we really do listen!

4. Follow us on Twitter

Twitter is another social media platform. We also love to hear from our fans on this medium. If you are on twitter please give us a follow and let`s connect!

5. Pin with All American Clothing Co.

Check out our Pinterest board and start pinning the many All American Clothing Co. photos that are available. The more we pin American made items, the more jobs we can create!

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We hope to hear from you in the many places we can connect with our made in America supporters. You can also send us an email at [email protected] if you would like to tell us how your clothing items are holding up. Thank you for your support!

Logan