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Fall is here, The Clothes Are Changing!

Ah! Our favorite time of the year is now underway. The temperature is starting to cool, football season is underway, and the clothes are definitely changing.

That being said, we are excited to introduce some new ladies long sleeve USA made tees along with some of our favorite men`s styles just in time for fall!

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Fine Jersey L/S made in USA tee.

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Men`s long sleeve USA made tee with pocket

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Fine Jersey L/S USA made ladies tee.

mens usa made long sleeve camo shirt

Men`s XDRI Performance Camo: Long sleeve tee made in USA

The Real Meaning of Labor Day.

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.

Labor Day Legislation

Through the years the nation gave increasing emphasis to Labor Day. The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed during 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on February 21, 1887. During the year four more states — Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York — created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 other states had adopted the holiday in honor of workers, and on June 28 of that year, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.

Support American Labor with All American Clothing Co. this Labor Day: Free Shipping on orders of $50 or more.

Founder of Labor Day

More than 100 years after the first Labor Day observance, there is still some doubt as to who first proposed the holiday for workers.

Some records show that Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a cofounder of the American Federation of Labor, was first in suggesting a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”

But Peter McGuire’s place in Labor Day history has not gone unchallenged. Many believe that Matthew Maguire, a machinist, not Peter McGuire, founded the holiday. Recent research seems to support the contention that Matthew Maguire, later the secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, N.J., proposed the holiday in 1882 while serving as secretary of the Central Labor Union in New York. What is clear is that the Central Labor Union adopted a Labor Day proposal and appointed a committee to plan a demonstration and picnic.

The First Labor Day

The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.

In 1884 the first Monday in September was selected as the holiday, as originally proposed, and the Central Labor Union urged similar organizations in other cities to follow the example of New York and celebrate a “workingmen’s holiday” on that date. The idea spread with the growth of labor organizations, and in 1885 Labor Day was celebrated in many industrial centers of the country.

Trace an All American Made Jean back to over 12,000 American workers, including the American farmers who grew the cotton.

A Nationwide Holiday

The character of the Labor Day celebration has undergone a change in recent years, especially in large industrial centers where mass displays and huge parades have proved a problem. This change, however, is more a shift in emphasis and medium of expression. Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics and government officials are given wide coverage in newspapers, radio, and television.The form that the observance and celebration of Labor Day should take was outlined in the first proposal of the holiday — a street parade to exhibit to the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations” of the community, followed by a festival for the recreation and amusement of the workers and their families. This became the pattern for the celebrations of Labor Day. Speeches by prominent men and women were introduced later, as more emphasis was placed upon the economic and civic significance of the holiday. Still later, by a resolution of the American Federation of Labor convention of 1909, the Sunday preceding Labor Day was adopted as Labor Sunday and dedicated to the spiritual and educational aspects of the labor movement.

The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy. It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pay tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership — the American worker.

All American Clothing Co.

The Importance of American Manufacturing – Regina McRae

Hello Everyone,

I hope you had a wonderful Holiday weekend with your families. We did not have a segment last week due to Christmas, but I am very excited about our next guest, Regina McRae. She is a self accomplished woman who has endeavored a lot to become one of New York`s finest cake artists. There is much more to this woman than just her baking skills. Regina is a genuine person who cares about American Manufacturing. And, she is just as sweet as the icing on her cakes!

Regina McRae

Regina McRae

Regina McRae is the Founder of Grandma`s Secrets, a home style bakery in New York. Regina and her baking skills have been featured in Oprah Magazine, The New York Times, and The Food Network.

Q. Please tell us a little about yourself.

A. I began my business 17 years ago with $10 and 9 pies. Despite overwhelming odds, and numerous obstacles, I never stopped believing in myself or my products. I have emerged as one of NYC’s premiere cake artists, and seek to give back to the business community as much as I can.

Q. Why is American Manufacturing important to you?

A. We cannot look to the government to bring us out this economic slump. We have to turn to ourselves. That means keeping jobs here in the USA, shopping small, and supporting small businesses.

Q. Where did your passion for USA manufacturing begin?

A. My mother was a nurse, and was union, so I grew up with a strong faith in unions and Americans supporting each other. However, when the economy began to collapse, and I watched as more and more major corporations outsourced, and jobs became fewer and fewer, I realized each of us can do something about it. Buy American, refuse to support companies that outsource or don’t hire union, and stand up for your beliefs.

Q. How have you expressed that passion throughout your life?

A. I never crossed a picket line, have stood behind American workers, sign petitions or any little thing I can do to support American workers’ causes, and encourage others to shop small. I shun mega-corporations, would rather by hand made or home made than off the rack, and am very vocal in encouraging others to follow my lead.

Q. What is your favorite quote?

A. We are Main Street, not Wall Street. We are not going to get bailed out. We have to shop small, and shop American.

It was a great pleasure to have interviewed Regina this week. Just checking out her website will make your mouth water! You can find her home baked goods at http://www.grandmasecrets.com/. Thank you all for stopping in for another week on ‘The Importance of American Manufacturing.’

Logan

All American Clothing Co.

If you, or someone you know, would be interested in being interviewed on the Importance of American Manufacturing, please send inquiries to Logan Beam at logan@allamericanclothing.com

The Importance of American Manufacturing – Senator Sherrod Brown (OH)

By: Logan Beam

In this section, I will be interviewing American citizens about the importance of American Manufacturing. The truth is, we are all citizens before we are businessmen, celebrities, athletes, servicemen, or politicians. This segment is a place where all types of American citizens can come together to share ideas, insights, and offer ways to benefit our economy. Notice I said our economy. There are many ways Americans can come together and support a great cause. I hope this is one of them.

This week`s guest is Senator Sherrod Brown (OH).

Senator Sherrod Brown

Senator Sherrod Brown (OH)

Q. Please tell us a little about yourself.

A. I’m the senior U.S. Senator representing my home state of Ohio. I grew up in Mansfield but now live in Avon with my wife, Connie. We have three daughters, a son, a daughter-in-law, and a grandson.

Q. Why is American Manufacturing important to you?

A. Manufacturing is critical to our nation’s middle class and to creating good-paying jobs that help us out-compete and out-innovate the rest of the world. Unlike wealth created by the click of a computer mouse, wealth created by expanded production in manufacturing requires an expanded workforce. Manufacturing jobs pay 20 percent more on average than service jobs. And it is no secret that Ohio’s manufacturing jobs have strong multiplier effects — supporting jobs in other sectors of our economy. Manufacturing also accounts for 70 percent of our research and development, more than 90 percent of patents issued, more than 90 percent of Ohio’s exports, and is critical to our national security and our energy security.

Q. Where did your passion for USA manufacturing begin?

A. Growing up in Mansfield, so many families were able to buy new cars, take family vacations, and send their children to college—all because of that paycheck they earned working in manufacturing. Our country’s middle class was built on the success of manufacturing and I’m working to ensure that the next generation of manufacturing jobs is able to support Ohio’s families.

Q. How have you expressed that passion throughout your life?

A. Throughout my time in office, I’ve been committed to putting American manufacturing — and Ohio workers — first. As a nation, we have been without a focused strategy on maintaining a strong manufacturing base and growing this sector. To address this deficiency, I have been calling for a National Manufacturing Strategy to propel the public and private sectors towards a renewed focus on manufacturing job growth. That’s why I worked with U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk (R-IL) to introduce the National Manufacturing Strategy Act, legislation aimed at bolstering the competitiveness of the American manufacturing industry. By requiring the development of a national manufacturing strategy, the bill would boost traditional and high-tech manufacturing, spur American job growth, and strengthen the middle class.

I have also been working with my colleagues to pass the Bring Jobs Home Act, which ends tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas and cuts taxes for businesses to bring jobs back to the United States. Companies bringing jobs home would still be able to claim the current moving expense deduction when bringing jobs home, and would also receive a tax credit equal to 20 percent of the cost associated with bringing jobs and business activity back to the United States.

Q. What is your favorite quote?

A. I often think about the words of a Mississippi civil rights leader who said, “Don’t tell me what you believe. Show me what you do and I’ll tell you what you believe.”

I am very humbled to have had Senator Brown on our segment this week. I would like to thank him for taking the time to share his thoughts on The Importance of American Manufacturing. I hope you all enjoyed this segment and that you too, will share The Importance of American Manufacturing with someone you know.

Have an All American Day!

Join us next week for another segment of “The Importance of American Manufacturing”

If you, or someone you know, would be interested in being interviewed on the Importance of American Manufacturing, please send inquiries to Logan Beam at logan@allamericanclothing.com

Your Voice Heard Right Here!

In our last survey we asked you to vote on the new usa made items you would like us to carry! Since then, we have taken your votes into account and have some upcoming new items in the works! In this survey your voice will be heard once again as we are looking for your preference when it comes to the shade of blue denim in your jeans or shorts! Please vote and have your voice heard in being a part of what we do at the All American Clothing Co!

CLICK HERE TO VIEW OUR LATEST NEWS IN THE PRESS!

So with that being said,

Thank you!

Logan

All American Clothing Co.