Showroom Opens Up World Of The All American Clothing Co. To Public.

All American Clothing Co., the premiere online location for USA made clothing items, announces the debut of its new  concept with the opening of a showroom in its Arcanum, Ohio location. Located at 1 Pop Rite Rd, just south of Arcanum, Ohio, the showroom will feature the many American made items that All American Clothing Co. has to offer. It will also feature an All American theme with its coloration, pictures, and objects.  The showroom is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM.
 

“For made in America supporters and enthusiasts, the showroom will create a unique experience into the world of All American Clothing Co. and its belief in supporting the American worker.,” said Logan Beam, Director of Marketing and Communications at All American Clothing Co. “All American Clothing Co. has always cared about the United States and the people in it. Our founders started manufacturing USA made jeans with a passion to never trade USA jobs for foreign profits. We are now able to showcase our passion, products, and services while creating a strong relationship with our customers.”

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A patriotic destination, the All American Clothing Co. showroom will provide customers the opportunity to discover the unique experiences they have to offer, like Traceability. Traceability is all about the truth of where jeans come from and offers some recognition to the hard working Americans who are involved in making jeans. All American Clothing Co. is one of the first jean companies in the world that allows customers to trace their jean all the way back to the American farmers who grew the cotton used. Each jean comes with a ‘Certificate of Authenticity’ that includes a traceability number. Enter the traceability number on the All American Clothing Co. website and they will tell you exactly which farmers and mill were involved in producing that jean.

How Does Traceability Work? Check out the video!

The showroom is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM Est. A knowledgeable and passionate team of customer service experts will be available to help deliver the ‘All American’ experience.

Logan

All American Clothing Co.

Freedom Is Not Free… Or Is It?

This week, the All American Clothing Co. will be giving away just a few freebies to spread some good ol ‘All American’ happiness during tax week! We really do appreciate all of your help in supporting the American worker with our USA made jeans and clothing items. Thank you.

Please sign up for a chance to win a free item by subscribing to the All American Newsletter. If you are already a member, you do not have to sign up again.

This week`s All American Clothing Co. newsletter giveaways are…

Monday – ‘Freedom’ Tee:

Tuesday – AA Chrome Tee

Wednesday – Sock item of choice

Thursday – $50 Gift Certificate

Friday – Special Surprise

Freedom Tee

“Freedom Is Not Free” Tee

Have an ‘All American’ week!

Logan

All American Clothing Co.

All American Pricing, Quality Explained…

Thank you all for supporting American made products at the All American Clothing Co. We truly would not be here without your help and understanding of the need for manufacturing in the USA. Many Americans would not have jobs today without you. Thank you.

For those of you who ask us about the price we wanted to explain why the cost of USA made goods is higher. As you will read, it becomes increasingly difficult for companies to stay in USA. With your help we hope to create American jobs and to “never trade those American jobs for foreign profits”. Please read the statement below from our Co-Founder Lawson Nickol as he explains why American Made pricing and quality is more expensive.

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From The Desk Of Lawson Nickol,

1. 1. Taxes are higher, 2. the cost of cotton fabrics (up over 200% in the past several years), 3. supply and demand (majority of cotton in USA is sold to china and other countries that have the majority of the apparel industry), 4. the US has lost over 84% of it’s revenue in the cut and sew industry over the last 10 years, 5. even China says it will raise it’s price and labor rates by 30% to 40% of the next 3 years (but they haven’t done it yet), 6. pay rate in USA is 4 to 5 times more than the rate in the foreign countries, 7.  no tariff to stop the manufacturing processes and labor atrocities in the foreign companies. 8. QUALITY OF THE PRODUCT AND SERVICE (FABRIC Quality, SEWING Quality, ABILITY TO RETURN AND EXCHANGE), 9. minimum wage in the USA vs China, Pakistan, Mexico, Bangladesh, etc. puts the USA in an impossible competitive price.

2. If All American Clothing only wanted to make money, I sure would not be able to do it in the USA.

3. After 8 years of testing and tracking the durability of the product, we have proven that you can buy our product and expect to average buying only once every 2.3 years.  Or you can buy 1 pair of the lighter weight (foreign product) 2 times and still have to buy 2 pair of worn out/deteriorated pair jeans. This indicates nearly the same cost value.

Yep, ours is higher cost, but I buy a lot of higher cost products that are made in the USA in order to support tax base, jobs, SSN, police, firemen, hospitals, infrastructure, military, freedom, etc etc. I don’t buy foreign jeans and help to support labor atrocities, child labor, pour manufacturing quality, give money to the foreign governments, on and on and on. I know you didn’t ask me about my buying habits, but the big picture and the future require USA jobs and product production. If that was not important to me… I would make jeans in Mexico and sell them to America. I would get wealthy and US Americans would still lose jobs, leave economic problems for you future generations, begin to deteriorate your own standard of living.

We know that the jeans we sell are priced higher than many foreign made jeans, but we are lower than the average jeans made in the USA. And, there are legitimate reasons. Since the USA garment industry has all but left the USA (only 3% of the garments purchased in the USA are still made in the USA) I am proud to be one of the very few still making the jeans in the USA and supporting the government and people that understand the reasons we are not really that costly compared to the cost of the decline of all the above issues. Our country is in trouble unless we change the direction we are headed.

Thank you for your support.

Lawson

All American Clothing Co.

All American Clothing Co

Outsourced

Outsourcing Effect

Photo Credit: The Colorado Observer

By Logan Beam

Man wakes up in OUTSOURCED blanket

Brushes his teeth with OUTSOURCED toothpaste

Puts on his OUTSOURCED clothes

Ties his OUTSOURCED shoes

Drives to his work in OUTSOURCED car

Works at his OUTSOURCED computer

Talks on OUTSOURCED phone

Months later, his job is OUTSOURCED.

www.allamericanclothing.com

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How To Wash Your Jeans – All American Clothing Co.

A pair of All American Jeans will last you a very long time but if you want yours to last longer, remain shrinkage free, and even keep other clothes from being damaged in the wash, please follow…

  ‘The Method’

All American Jeans - How to wash

First, be sure to read the label in your All American jeans.

  1. Read the care label inside your All American jean.
  2. Empty the pockets.
  3. Turn your jeans inside out.
  4. Set the washing cycle to delicate.
  5. Only load All American Jeans with other jeans in the washer. Make sure the load setting is on heavy.
  6. As our tag reads, ‘machine wash warm with like colors.’ You can also wash with cold water. Do not use hot water.
  7. If you like softer USA made jeans, add fabric softener during the rinse cycle.
  8. Remove your jeans right after the washing cycle is complete.
  9. Turn the jeans right side out and proceed to dry them.
  10. You can dry your jeans in a number of ways:
    1. Hang them on a clothes line or rack to air dry. If you are indoors, lay some towels down to catch the dripping water.
    2. You can put your All American jeans in the dryer. Be sure to turn the dryer on the lowest temperature setting. NOTE: Jeans that are air dried are less likely to shrink and fade than jeans in a dryer.
    3. After drying, hang your jeans instead of folding to avoid wrinkles and creases.

WARNING:

  • Hot water and jeans do not mix.
  • Hot dryers and jeans do not mix.
  • Other USA made clothing items and jeans do not mix. They turn blue.
  • Light blue jeans and dark blue jeans do not mix.
  • Never try to shrink your jeans on your own. They will shrink unevenly. Contact us and we will have the sizing altered.
  • Black jeans shrink more than blue jeans. Keep warm temperatures and time cycles lower than usual when washing and drying.

If you have any questions about washing and drying your All American Jeans, please feel free to contact our customer service department by phone or email.

Logan

All American Clothing Co.

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The All American Clothing Co. WOW! Program.

The primary goal of the WOW! Program is to provide an ‘extra comfort’ to customers who are not familiar with online shopping.

The WOW! Program consists of 4 steps:

1.) Free Returns and Exchanges: Online shoppers at the USA made clothing company`s website may order the wrong size, find the sizing on the clothing company`s website to be wrong, or may receive the wrong items upon shipping and arrival. It`s nobody`s fault. The WOW! Program`s free return and exchange policy allows the shopper to exchange and correct a problem if needed. Knowing that a free fix is available will allow the consumer to shop more comfortably.

2.) Sizing Chart: It is very important for the All American Clothing Co. to provide a sizing chart. TheirUSA made clothing items will always fit differently on all body types. The WOW! Program`s sizing chart will allow shoppers to match up a particular item with their specific body type.

3.) World Class Customer Service: Having a real person available at any time can provide a quick fix to any help an online shopper may need. Today, the All American Clothing Co. provides this service through the telephone, email, and even social media websites. Adding a personal touch to the shopper`s experience is a great way for the American made clothingcompany to provide extra comfort and get to know their customers.

4.) Free Shipping and Rewards: The All American Clothing Co. offers free shipping on orders of $99 or more. They also offer a rewards program for their shoppers online.

These are just a few ways that the All American Clothing Co. makes an effort to make customers comfortable when shopping online. The American made clothing company also goes a step further with its ‘Tell Us Your Story’ section on their website. Shoppers can really connect with the All American Clothing Co. in sharing their photos and comments within this section. For more infortmation on the All American Clothing Co. and its WOW! Program, visithttp://www.allamericanclothing.com or check them out on facebook.

Logan

All American Clothing Co.

5 Ways You Can Support Made in America, Create Jobs in 2013:

Make 2013 the year to support Made in USA!

All American Clothing Co.

2013 is the year to buy American! Start today at www.allamericanclothing.com

1. Check the tag or label.

This is simple. When shopping, check the tag on the item you are about to purchase to see if it`s made in USA. If you are comparing between two or more items, knowing you will create jobs by selecting one product over another will make your decision easier.

2. Attain groceries from the farmer`s market and check groceries in stores for made in USA label.

If you are like us, many of you are constantly loading up on groceries for your families. If that’s the case, you can enjoy a family meal or two through supporting local farmers markets and searching labels in the grocery store that say made in USA. The American farmer is one of the most dedicated and hardworking people in our country. The saying “If you had a good meal today, thank a farmer” holds a lot of truth to it. We also have a lot of farmers to thank for growing the cotton used in our USA Made jeans! You can thank a farmer today by visiting the farmer`s market!

3. Raise Awareness when shopping with a friend.

Shoppers often go shopping together. This makes an ideal time to raise awareness to a friend or family member. You do not even have to say anything to them while shopping. Just raise awareness in setting an example through your actions. Show a friend how it`s done!

4. Support local business.

Go local and support small businesses!

5. When online shopping, search for Made in USA companies or businesses.

Like us, there are many distributors of Made in USA merchandise online. All you have to do is search ‘Made in USA products’ on a search engine. You may be surprised with the number of companies who, like us are USA Made!

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As a closing remark, we encourage and CHALLENGE you to take these 5 steps towards making a difference. Following these steps can go a long way in creating new jobs. We also CHALLENGE you to support ANY American Made cause throughout 2013. You can make a difference if you have not already.

Start today!

Logan

All American Clothing Co.

This Week On The Importance Of American Manufacturing

Makers Row

Meet the Makers Row team. Their mission is to make the manufacturing process simple to understand and easy to access. From large corporations to first time designers, they provide unparalleled access to industry-specific factories and suppliers across the United States.

Q. Please tell us a little about yourself/your company?
A. Matthew Burnett- I am a Detroit native that has been living in New York for several years. My grandfather inspired my interest in small shop manufacturing as he was a watchmaker by trade. He built a miniature workshop desk for all my brothers to play with craft tools beside him. Later, I received a BFA in industrial design from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. I began my professional career designing watches for Marc Jacobs, DKNY, and Diesel, later becoming senior watch designer for Izod. After working in the watch industry for some time, I decided to start my own line, Steel Cake, having watches made overseas. Manufacturing as a small independent company overseas eventually became so frustrating and expensive that I decided to start manufacturing goods in the United States and founded The Brooklyn Bakery. Tanya and I met during this period and unified our complimentary skill sets to tackle the fashion industry. While sourcing here in the United States we encountered many obstacles in finding the right manufacturer. From there, the idea of making domestic sourcing more accessible was created.

Tanya Menendez - I’m from California and a sociologist by training. I’m most interested in the intersection of technology and society, and early in my career I focused on researching technology in rural areas with Tricia Wang. During college I also interned for Google in Mtn. View and some think-tanks in DC, but I ultimately decided to move to NYC to accept an offer from Goldman Sachs. While at Goldman, I was working on automation projects but I was also working with Matthew part-time on weekends and late nights, and really enjoyed the work: I loved how his company was supporting a network of local factories and other small businesses. He asked me to come on full-time as a co-owner and I quit my job at Goldman. As we were trying to expand the business, we realized that there was a huge lack of transparency and community within the industry. It would take us months to find the right factory, so we decided to create Maker’s Row to solve this problem. We applied for the Brooklyn Beta Summer Camp to help accelerate the process of creating a tech company, and that is where we found Scott via Collabfinder.com

Scott Weiner – Scott has been designing and developing websites since the age of 13. Growing up on Long Island, he created his first website – a Simpsons fan page. After getting a BFA in Communications Design at Syracuse University, he held Art Director positions at design firms and ad agencies in the tri-state area. He started up Brandwagon in 2009 — a design shop that catered to clients, including: Comedy Central, Sesame Street, Blip.tv, DailyWorth.com, as well as several ad agencies. Branding, websites, and online ads were his niche. He also started to develop his own iPhone apps as a hobby and enjoyed having control of a product from concept to execution. That led him to venture out into the tech startup scene this year — going to meetups and applying to Brooklyn Beta Summer Camp, where he ultimately met Tanya and Matthew on CollabFinder.com.

Maker’s Row is an online marketplace for American manufacturers and designers. Our mission is to make American manufacturing easy to access and simple to understand. We are a resource to the established businesses, and by equal importance, we are inspiring the next generation of American businesses to think domestic first.

Q. When were you/your company first inspired to support manufacturing in America?

A. The inspiration for Maker’s Row arose from our own need, and realizing that other entrepreneurs had the same need. Two of the co-founders (Matthew and Tanya) were running The Brooklyn Bakery together we were really frustrated at how difficult it was for us to find the proper manufacturer. It would take us months to find the right factories and materials, which really slowed our growth. Whenever we would go to events for product-based entrepreneurs, sourcing would always come up as an issue.

Before we created Maker’s Row, we saw that sourcing was a multi-faceted problem: there is no comprehensive resource, little community, and very little transparency. This made it so that it would take a very long time to find a manufacturer and supplier, and if you are a small company, that takes away from the time you can spend designing, marketing and selling. Makers Row is making manufacturing accessible and what might have taken a designer months to find with multiple specialty resources, is now accessible in one comprehensive platform.

Q. Why is American Manufacturing important to you/your company?

A. American Manufacturing is important to us because of the enormous effect it has on everyone, whether you small rural communities, or big cities. The importance of domestic manufacturing has been underplayed for decades in the United States and we have seen the negative effects that has had in cities nationwide. The manufacturing community is extremely fragmented and we saw an amazing opportunity in which we could serve as a platform to unite factories and product based businesses here in the US.

Q. How have you/your company supported American manufacturing throughout your life?

A. Matthew: As soon as I was of age to work held summer jobs in a number of craftsman studios from frame shops to local artisan markets. I have had a number of years working with small and medium sized businesses that relied primarily on American manufacturing. My grandfather was a horologist and owned his own watch shop in Detroit MI, and has always been an inspiration to me in seeing what impact small businesses have in their communities.

Q. Favorite quote? (Can be fun, motivational, etc. etc)

A. “We cannot build our own future without helping others to build theirs.”
- Bill Clinton

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It was a great pleasure to have interviewed the Makers Row team this week. If you are a manufacturer or anyone who is in need of supplies for making things in America, MakersRow.Com is your place for many resources!  Thank you all for reading another week of ‘The Importance of American Manufacturing.’

Join us next week on Monday for another segment of “The Importance of American Manufacturing”

If you, or someone you know, would be interested in being interviewed on the Importance of American Manufacturing, please send inquiries to Logan Beam at [email protected]

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